Peranbu movie review | Mammootty, Sadhana starrer is a devastatingly beautiful drama

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Peranbu movie review : Tamil cinema has had its share of father-daughter based films with Ajith’s Viswasam being the latest offering. However, it’s going to be extremely difficult to find a film as affecting as well disturbing in this space as Mammootty starrer Peranbu, and all credit goes to its director Ram for taking a road less travelled and giving us a film for years to remember and celebrate. In what can be described as a departure from his style of filmmaking, Peranbu is Ram’s quietest and most meditative and most rewarding film in years and it is going to be really tough to replace it.

In Ram’s Peranbu, life hits you like a ton of bricks and it is one of those blows you cannot recover from easily. Walking out of Peranbu leaves you with a feeling that is too hard to digest, yet gut-wrenchingly beautiful. The plot revolves around a father (Mammootty as Amudhavan), who has recently taken custody of his spastic daughter (Sadhana as Paapa) and events that follow in their life. There has never been a more affecting father-daughter film, and Peranbu, which is easily Ram’s most rewarding work, goes beyond the usual parent and daughter bonding, exploring different facets of the relationship in the most sensitive manner.

Unlike most parent and child stories, Peranbu, among various others things, focuses a lot on a father’s understanding and dealing with his daughter’s sexuality. The entire first half is set in the middle of nowhere, and in the midst of nature. The story is narrated in chapters and each one has a reference to nature, aiding in making us understand that sexuality is among the most natural things and there is nothing wrong in dealing with it.

There is a beautiful stretch where Amudhavan seeks the help of a worker in a brothel to find someone who can attend to his daughter. As cringe-worthy as it may seem, Ram stages the scene in such a way that we only see the predicament of a father who is unable to help his daughter deal with her sexuality, and the feeling haunts him.

Peranbu teaches us it is fine to not judge people. When we learn Amudhavan’s wife has left him for another man, we do not see him cribbing. We hear him say she is not a bad woman. When Amudhavan meets Meera (Anjali Ameer), a transsexual sex worker, he does not judge her profession. When he gets cheated by someone, he says they might have their reason. It is rare to find someone so non-judgmental but at the same time, it is refreshing to have such a protagonist for a change.

Peranbu really gets disturbing after a point. Some scenes are so raw, it is extremely difficult to shake off the shock factor. It is disturbing because the reality hits us hard and gives us an opportunity to see life from the perspective of two different personalities.  It is while raising his daughter and through her eyes, Amudhavan sees the world around him differently. Initially, when he takes custody of his daughter, he behaves like a parent and as the story progresses, we see him transform into a companion. The transformation process comes with its share of life lessons.

Over all Mammootty as a confused parent, Amudhavan, is his most natural self. It is amazing how a Superstar of his stature quickly sheds the glitz when given a challenging script. A few minutes into Peranbu, you realise there is much more to the story of a single father Amudhavan (Mammootty), whose whole world is his daughter Paapa (Sadhana).

60%
Good
  • Gossipganj Rating